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    Kevin Dalby

    Professor of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry,

    The University of Texas at Austin

    currently working on cancer drug discovery

  • Professor Kevin Dalby, UT Austin

    About Me

    Dr. Kevin Dalby (@KevinNDalby) is a professor of chemical biology and medicinal chemistry in the College of Pharmacy, and Department of Oncology at The University of Texas in Austin. He studies mechanisms of cell signaling to develop targeted therapeutics. Dr. Dalby's research areas include biochemistry, cancer, cell biology, chemical biology, drug discovery & diagnostics, and enzymology.

     

    He has been interested in the “why” of chemical reactions since he was a student at the University of Cambridge, where he graduated with a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Organic Chemistry. This curiosity has led to his interest in the processes of cell signaling, and ultimately to cancer research. He has been fortunate to be trained by some of the worlds most prominent scientists. More recently he has also turned his attention to identifying ways to overcome infections by coronaviruses, such as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) which is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

     

    The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) and the National Institutes of Health, have recognized Dr. Dalby's efforts by supporting his research.

    Dr. Dalby is the director of The Targeted Therapeutic Drug Discovery & Development Program (TTP). This program provides scientists in Texas access to resources for drug discovery research. By understanding cancer cell signaling, Dr. Dalby works to utilize technological advances to develop targeted pharmaceuticals for different cancers.

     

    The Dalby laboratory is developing a small molecule screening program to identify strategies and lead compounds to address the current COVID-19 pandemic as well as future coronavirus outbreaks. These screens target multiple critical elements of a coronavirus infection cycle, including its ability to enter host cells, to replicate within the host, and to avoid the host’s immune surveillance. These screens make possible the implementation of strategies to target both host and viral proteins using FDA-approved drugs, drugs in pre-clinical development, as well as many thousands of in-house test compounds. While tremendous effort is underway to develop vaccines for the current pandemic, this development faces enormous challenges and will likely not address future epidemics. It is critical for the future health and economic security of the US to develop a suite of candidate drugs for future pandemics.

  • Education

    Dundee University, Scotland

    1992-1994

    Medical Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow

    Medical Research Council Protein Phosphorylation Unit

    Department of Biochemistry

    Research Advisor: Professor Sir Philip Cohen, Fellow of the Royal Society

    Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

    1988-1992

    Postdoctoral Fellow, National Institutes of Health

    Research Advisor: Professor William P. Jencks, Fellow of the Royal Society

    University of Cambridge, England

    1988-1992

    Doctor of Philosophy in Organic Chemistry

    Title of Dissertation: Models of Nuclease Activity

    Research Advisor: Professor Anthony J. Kirby, Fellow of the Royal Society​

    University of Leeds, England

    1985-1988

    Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

    Graduated with 1st class honors

  • The Blog

    Originally published on wfmj.com Professor at the University of Texas in Austin, Dr. Kevin Dalby comments on the steps required before a potential vaccine against COVID-19 can be approved. AUSTIN, TEXAS, USA, October 7, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Utilizing vaccination as a method to prevent...
    Originally published on thriveglobal.com Whether it’s viral or bacterial, you hope to bounce back quickly and return to your usual routine when you get an infection. In most cases, that’s what happens. That’s because the organized team of players called your immune system defeats the foreign...
    Originally published on timeslifestyle.net Staying focused at work is key to being effective at your job. Still, sometimes it can be hard to remain sharp, especially when completing monotonous tasks or on days where you are just tired. At the same time, we can see that there is nothing wrong...
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